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Strathclyde Eagle 07-02-2010 12:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pauldrulez
What I think is a bargain bet.

Total Sacks: 3.5. The over is about 2/1.

The Colts will get at least 2 sacks and Manning wont be upright for the entire game.

I'd say it's almost a certainty to be more than 3.5

Manning's only been sacked ten times all year. Don't think that's a goer, but we'll see.
Quote:

Originally Posted by jazman
Looking ahead a little just watched Total Access where they mentioned next year as a potential uncapped season with 2011 possibly being a non starter even! :eek:

Not new news, unfortunately (the 2011 being a non-starter part, that is - an uncapped year, while unfortuate, isn't a disaster by itself). Is this what Jerry Jones got fined for talking about a while ago?

oz_da II 07-02-2010 12:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pauldrulez
What I think is a bargain bet.

Total Sacks: 3.5. The over is about 2/1.

The Colts will get at least 2 sacks and Manning wont be upright for the entire game.

I'd say it's almost a certainty to be more than 3.5

If it was almost a certainty it wouldn't be out there.
"Vegas" rarely gets it wrong.

Strathclyde Eagle 07-02-2010 01:05 AM

oz, are you going to be thinking what I'm thinking when David Thomas gets his third catch? :D

oz_da II 07-02-2010 02:14 AM

Yes, it has to happen. Hopefully late on. :p

Can't believe Cousin Sal bet on the Pro Bowl and obviously lost.

saxoneagle 07-02-2010 07:34 AM

Saints to win
Bush first TD
Low scorer
MVP Bush

(My wife is from Texas and hates USC's Reggie but has to support Saints tomorrow - I hope Bush has a career game just to annoy her :D)

saxoneagle 07-02-2010 07:35 AM

PS - I have Monday off, too. And the rest of the month, too :D

jazman 07-02-2010 09:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Strathclyde Eagle
Manning's only been sacked ten times all year. Don't think that's a goer, but we'll see.

Not new news, unfortunately (the 2011 being a non-starter part, that is - an uncapped year, while unfortuate, isn't a disaster by itself). Is this what Jerry Jones got fined for talking about a while ago?

First I had heard about potentail 2011 no football ... had heard about the uncapped year though. But I guess it would rear it's head now that they only have the SB to talk about ...

pauldrulez 07-02-2010 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Strathclyde Eagle
Manning's only been sacked ten times all year. Don't think that's a goer, but we'll see.

Not new news, unfortunately (the 2011 being a non-starter part, that is - an uncapped year, while unfortuate, isn't a disaster by itself). Is this what Jerry Jones got fined for talking about a while ago?

I'm thinking more on Freeney/Mathis when they are on the field together, getting to Brees. I also think a couple of exotic blitzes are coming at Manning in this game.

As for 2011, i'm 80% that there will be no football.

pauldrulez 07-02-2010 09:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Strathclyde Eagle
oz, are you going to be thinking what I'm thinking when David Thomas gets his third catch? :D

I'm thinking 5+ catches for Thomas.

I think Shockey is still hurt and Brees loves Thomas. Quick outs after chipping Mathis at the line will be his job.

Strathclyde Eagle 07-02-2010 10:02 AM

Non-BS Report fans look away now.
Quote:

Originally Posted by oz_da II
Can't believe Cousin Sal bet on the Pro Bowl and obviously lost.

Cousin Sal has a big problem. Think I knew that last year when he put $3000 on Gary Russell not to score a TD when he was always their goalline option. Well researched, Sal. :D

He's very funny though. I enjoy listening to him throughout the season, and I'm looking forward to his Survivor summary even though I've never watched Survivor.

Top 5 BS Report guests (IMHO):
5) House.
4) Chuck Closterman.
3) Chris Connelly.
2) Cousin Sal.
1) Jack-O (I forgive his Baseball allegiance, his calls with Simmons remind me of the way I'll discuss stuff on the phone with my mates).

Carolla probably moves up if he was on more often. His Pedaf Isle film idea remains one of the funniest things I've ever heard.

oz_da II 07-02-2010 10:17 AM

Agreed on all those, S_E.

I even find the Jersey Shore conversations enjoyable even though I have no idea who is who on that show or what is the purpose of the show .

I also enjoyed the recent conversation with Jason Reitman (movie director) as there was quite a bit of hockey content.

Carolla is great, his podcast is the first thing I listen to at work everyday.

Strathclyde Eagle 07-02-2010 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oz_da II
I also enjoyed the recent conversation with Jason Reitman (movie director) as there was quite a bit of hockey content.

Probably shouldn't admit this but I didn't have a clue who he was until I listened to that. He was a very good guest though. Pity he's a Kings fan. ;)

oz_da II 07-02-2010 10:42 AM

Best part of that interview was when he slagged off Leafs fans. :p

Bellyman 07-02-2010 11:03 AM

Wooo Superbowl Sunday!!!

peagle 07-02-2010 11:29 AM

Nice Article on Thurday in the Times about todays game (well, about the Saints really). Know someone who spent a few weeks in New Orleans in the Summer and says their love for and connection with their team is just incredible).

Quote:

Back in the days when the New Orleans Saints were so dire that they were dubbed the “Aints”, and fans covered their heads in paper bags for shame, a local television personality called Buddy Diliberto promised to dance through the streets in women’s clothes if the team ever reached the Super Bowl. Diliberto died in 2005, but earlier this week thousands of New Orleanian males kept his promise for him ahead of the Saints’ historic game against the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday.

They came in frocks, miniskirts and flowing purple robes; in fishnet tights, high heels and feather boas; hulking XXL-sized men revealing voluminous midriffs and adjusting lopsided boobs as they minced and sashayed from the Superdome to the French Quarter. They chanted the war cry of their beloved football team: “Who dat? Who dat? Who dat say they gonna beat them Saints?” Crowds of onlookers packed the streets, whooping in delight.

Mardi Gras has come early to New Orleans this year. Life has been one riotous, non-stop celebration since January 24, when the Saints reached the Super Bowl for the first time in their 43-year history with a last-gasp victory over the Minnesota Vikings.

From the tablecloths in its Cajun restaurants to the tassels of its strippers’ bikinis, the city is decked out in the team’s black and gold colours. Its musicians have composed dozens of songs in their honour. Priests wear Saints shirts in place of their vestments and give thanks for the team in their churches. Umpteen improvised versions of When the Saints Go Marching In blast from bars, stores and car speakers. Truly, the good times are rolling again.


“The Saints’ first appearance in one of the world’s biggest sporting events in the middle of the carnival season has rocketed the city’s mood into the stratosphere,” the local Times-Picayune newspaper reports. Politics has long been New Orleans’ other contact sport, but candidates in the mayoral primary on Saturday despair at the lack of attention.

New Orleans is not just celebrating the Saints’ sporting success, of course. It is also celebrating what that success symbolises — the city’s own recovery from the apocalyptic destruction wrought by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. After so much grief and suffering, the team’s victory against the Vikings has sparked a great, cathartic explosion of stranger-hugging, trumpet-blaring, weepy-eyed joy.

“You can knock us down but you can’t knock us out,” proclaimed Craig Hill, 45, an accountant, as he cavorted down Canal Street in a blonde wig, long flowing dress and Doc Martens. “We’re back. We’re back for good,” declared Tommy Keller, 51, an insurance salesman dripping garish beads and lipstick.

It is indeed astonishing to mingle with the ecstatic throngs on the streets of central New Orleans and remember that just four and a half years ago, four fifths of this historic city was submerged beneath 40 billion gallons of filthy, corpse-infested water, its entire population had been evacuated, and there was real doubt that the Big Easy would ever recover. That it has done so is due, to a remarkable degree, to the Saints.

The story sounds almost too good to be true, but true it is. After Katrina the team decamped to San Antonio, Texas — the 35-year-old Superdome having been trashed first by the hurricane and then by the 30,000 homeless who considered its dark, stinking interior, with bodies stored in the catering freezers, marginally preferable to the watery hell outside. For a while the team looked likely to remain permanently in Texas, but there was such an outcry that the idea was rapidly dropped.

Instead, Tom Benson, the Saints’ owner, recruited a new coach, Sean Payton, and some star players such as Drew Brees, the quarterback, and Scott Fujita, a linebacker, who chose to join the Saints precisely because the city was so devastated. “Within two or three hours of visiting my wife and I felt we had to be here. I wanted to be part of the healing,” says Fujita, a 6ft 5in, 250lb Californian with an intelligence and idealism that belies the standard image of a football player. “Most of our family thought we were crazy.”

The Saints duly came marching back, and the people of New Orleans — or at least those who remained — showed their gratitude by buying every last season ticket for the first time in the club’s history. A thousand workers, many of whom had lost their homes, laboured frantically to rehabilitate the Superdome in time for the opening game of the 2006 season. On September 26 that year 70,003 fans watched the team thrash the Atlanta Falcons 23-3, turning a stadium that had become a symbol of horror one year earlier into a cauldron of delirious emotion.

Things only got better. The Saints went on to enjoy their most successful season ever, winning their division and reaching the play-offs before losing to the Chicago Bears one game short of the Super Bowl. The dejected team flew back to a rainy New Orleans in the small hours and found tens of thousands of members of the so-called “Who Dat Nation” waiting at the airport to thank them for rallying and inspiring their broken city.

The team’s contribution extended far beyond the football field, however. Led by Brees, a staunch Christian who bought a storm-damaged New Orleans home as a gesture of solidarity, they gave lavishly of their time and money — visiting schools and hospitals, helping the poor and the homeless, establishing charitable foundations and using their celebrity to raise millions of dollars to regenerate the city.

Stories abound of their individual acts of kindness — slipping money to desperate fathers, quietly paying the bills of the destitute in Walmart, buying a school a weight room, signing the head of a cancer patient rendered bald by chemotherapy. “A football player’s average career is a few years. It’s about trying to do good things in that very limited window of opportunity,” said Fujita, who was recently named the Saints’ Man of the Year for his charitable work.

New Orleanians have always adored the Saints, but they now love them far more than their streetcars, jazz and jambalayas, and with a passion that transcends every social divide — black and white, rich and poor, young and old. “The Saints are my heroes,” Alfred Hughes, the recently retired Archbishop of New Orleans, said after taking Mass in the cathedral last Sunday. “They have reached out to the city and taken it unto themselves.”

“Without them we would not have seen the rebirth of New Orleans. I really believe that,” says Sister Mary Andrew, the head of a Roman Catholic elementary school, whose office is adorned with Saints memorabilia. She is travelling to Miami for Sunday’s game, and on the day The Times visited her school, all 165 children were wearing black and gold.

In 2005 Charlene McBride, 57, an African-American hotel worker, lost her home in one of New Orleans’poorest neighbourhoods, suffered the horrors of the Superdome, and thought that her city was finished. Not any more. “The Saints have contributed so much. They gave everybody hope. This city has a future and everyone is sticking together,” she says.

“They’ve put so much joy back into people’s lives that they’ve mostly been able to forget the misery they’ve been through,” adds Alan Donnes, author of a book on the team’s return called Patron Saints.

But the traffic has been two-way. The Saints have drawn inspiration from the city’s unswerving support, and from its perseverance in the face of extreme adversity. “There’s an interdependency. They lean on us and we lean on them,” says Fujita, who feels honoured to represent the people of New Orleans. “There’s a direct correlation between our success and the belief that our city has in us,” adds Brees.

As the big game looms, New Orleans is not back to normal yet. There are still swathes of dereliction beyond the city centre. Roughly a third of the pre-Katrina population has opted not to return. Visitor numbers are still only about 70 per cent of what they were.

But the city’s future is no longer in doubt, and as Sunday's big game looms the excitement is reaching fever pitch. People talk of nothing else. Churches have cancelled Sunday evening services, and schools their Monday classes. Mardi Gras parades have been rescheduled. The opening of a long-awaited trial has been postponed.

Tens of thousands of New Orleanians are decamping to Miami in planes, cars and camper vans, with or without tickets, determined to be “in that number”. Many more Americans will be descending on New Orleans, ready to join the biggest street party in the city’s long and colourful history should the Saints prevail. The curmudgeonly NFL has banned public screenings of the game, but every bar, restaurant and hotel lobby will be packed.

The Colts may be the odds-on favourites, but it is the Saints who have captured the country’s heart and imagination. A record 100 million Americans are expected to watch the game, and the overwhelming majority of them will be supporting the Saints. “If you’re not from Indianapolis and you’re rooting against the Saints, there’s something wrong with you. You’re a flawed human being,” says the Democratic strategist and native New Orleanian James Carville. Even President Obama admits that he is backing them.

Most New Orleanians are convinced that the Saints will win on Sunday. They feel that it is preordained, destiny, the only possible ending to an epic story. “It would be the ultimate culmination of everything we’ve been working for in the last four years,” says Fujita. “It’s been a tremendous effort by everybody — the teams, the coaches, the fans, the city — and we could say, ‘Together, we did it’.

But win or lose, the Saints and New Orleans have already triumphed. Together they have overcome a disaster of biblical proportions.

As Fujita’s wife, Jaclyn, said in a motivational text that she sent him just before the Vikings game: “You are a huge part of something great. Thank you for bringing me somewhere that changed my heart for ever. New Orleans will always be our home. It’s where our life took off.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/spo...cle7013861.ece

LLCOOLSTEVE 07-02-2010 12:43 PM

Off Monday :lux:

But off to Wycombe this afternoon to meet the GF's parents for first time :( Followed by a 90 min journey home hopefully in time for pre game show tonight!

AddiscombeEagle 07-02-2010 12:55 PM

i am not off monday, can't decide whether to watch it live or sky + it and get up at 5 and watch it before work.

Either way, go saints.

AddiscombeEagle 07-02-2010 12:55 PM

.

jazman 07-02-2010 01:00 PM

Just binned the Pro Bowl on Sky+ as I found it so boring ....

LLCOOLSTEVE 07-02-2010 01:05 PM

Really like over 3.5 FG's at 6/4 ish


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